Blog 2018-10-04T23:59:27+00:00

Blog

One Day Crowns

Oct 3, 2018

The evolution of the dental industry in the past few years has been amazing. Almost all the fields of dentistry have seen new technologies that developed recently. One of these incredible achievements is the development of the CEREC machines, also known as CAD\CAM technology.

The CEREC machine is a milestone in the prosthodontic department of dentistry. Through the use of this machine, dentists are now able to make one day crowns, which as the name suggests, are crowns that the patient can receive in one visit, in the same day, without having to go through the hassle of waiting a few days to get their crowns, or having to take time off work to schedule another appointment. Now, the patient can go to the dentist once and have all the work completed before he\she leaves.

In the old days, crowns were made in a different manner. After diagnosis and planning, the dentist would prepare the tooth to receive the crown by removing a small part (about 1 to 2 mm) from all the surfaces. After that, he would use a gel like material to take a replica (also known as an impression) of the prepared tooth and the surrounding teeth, and also of the opposing teeth to properly design the shape and length of the crown to fit the tooth. This impression is then sent to the lab, and the prepared tooth is covered by a temporary cover until the lab returns the final crown. Through a series of processes that include wax, metal and porcelain, the lab manufactures the crown for the exact shape of the prepared tooth and sends it back to the dentist, who then glues it to the tooth to be covered.

With CEREC, the process is quite different. The planning and preparation phases are the same as the conventional method, but instead of using the gooey gel-like material to take the replica, the dentist would use a highly specialized intraoral camera to record the shape of the tooth to be covered, along with the neighboring teeth, the opposing teeth, and the manner by which the patient bites, all in a single quick step, which improves comfort and decreased the problems that occur with using regular impressions such as gagging and discomfort.

After that, there is no need to involve the lab at all, since this camera is linked to a specialized computer program that is able to literally draw the crown to fit the tooth using specific measurements and instruction, and this eliminates all the guess work that the lab has to do, and minimizes human error so the crown will fit the tooth exactly, with no chance of being too small, too short or too large.

This computer is in turn linked to a specialized milling machine, that takes that drawn shape and mills it out of a block of metal or porcelain. This again eliminates all the errors that could occur when the conventional method is used, such as shrinkage of the material during setting and chipping and voids in the metal or porcelain.

So to sum it up, the entire process from beginning to end is done in one place, and takes about 2 hours. You could walk in the door, and walk out a couple of hours later with your finalized crown, and that’s it…. No temporaries, no waiting and no second appointment. Not only that, you would receive a crown that is far superior and far more accurate than the ones done through conventional means.

Patient Education

Education Videos

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding
Crowns & Bridgework
Fillings
Gummy Smiles
Inlays & Onlays
Mouthguards for Adults
Mouthguards for Children
Nitrous Oxide
Porcelain Veneers
Removable Dentures
Smile Makeover
Snoring & Sleep Apnea
Teeth Whitening
TMD
Tooth-Colored Fillings
Tooth Contouring & Reshaping
Tooth Decay Prevention
Tooth Wear

Gum Injuries
Orthodontic Emergencies
Tooth Pain
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Combined Root Canal & Gum Problems
Cracked Teeth
Root Canal Retreatment
Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)
Root Canal Treatment
Root Canal Treatment FAQs
Root Canal Treatment for Children
Tooth Sensitivity
Whitening Traumatized Teeth

Bone Grafting
Dental Implants FAQs
Fixed Dentures
Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth
Top Reasons to Choose Dental Implants

Aging & Dental Health
Antibiotic Premedicationfor Dental Treatments
Bad Breath
Blood Pressure Medications & Your Gums
Diabetes & Oral Health
Dry Mouth
Eating Disorders & Oral Health
Fluoride
Geographic Tongue
Missing Teeth
Nutrition & Oral Health
Oral Cancer
Oral Piercings
Osteoporosis & Oral Health
Pregnancy, Hormones & Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Stress & Oral Habits

How To Brush
How To Floss
Interdental Cleaning Devices
Mouthrinses
Oral Hygiene for Kids
Tips to Prevent Cavities
Toothpaste

Blood Thinners & Dental Procedures
Bone Grafting
Cleft Lip & Palate Repair
Corrective Jaw (Orthognathic) Surgery
Extractions
Facial Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery
Headaches & Migraines
Oral Cancer Screening
Oral Diagnosis and Biopsies
Sedation Dentistry
Sinus Surgery
Wisdom Teeth

Adolescent Orthodontic Care
Adult Orthodontic Treatment
Brushing & Flossing with Braces
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Invisalign for Adults
Invisalign for Teens
Post-Orthodontic Care
Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)
Thumb & Finger Appliances
Types of Braces
Orthodontic Emergencies
Orthodontic FAQs
Orthodontic Headgear
Orthodontics & Dental Hygiene
Your First Orthodontic Appointment

Age One Dental Visit
Fluoride & Your Child
Nitrous Oxide for Children
Pregnancy & Your Child’s Developing Teeth
Sealants
Sleep Apnea & Behavior Problems in Children
Space Maintainers
Teething
Thumb Sucking

Cosmetic Gum Surgery
Gum Grafting
Loose Teeth & Bite Problems
Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
Oral Systemic Connection
Periodontal (Gum) Disease
Periodontal Flap Surgery
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Ultrasonic Cleanings

Air Abrasion
Anesthesia Wand
Cone Beam CT Imaging
Digital Dental Impressions
Digital X-Rays
Intra-Oral Camera
Laser Decay Diagnosis
Laser Dentistry
Same-Day Crowns (CAD/CAM)

Invisalign

Sep 20, 2018

Invisible Orthodontic treatment

Everyone is dreaming of getting the perfectly aligned smile without needing veneers or mouth restoration. Do you think you are too old to go for orthodontic treatment, just for not wanting the conventional orthodontic braces or retainers to show? If yes, then the answer is in Invisalign system

Orthodontics is not only braces, now clear invisible aligners are available to straighten your teeth.   Invisalign is the safest, invisible way and painless procedure to level your teeth. It is the world’s most advanced digital orthodontics, with precise, predictable & gradual tooth movement in an efficient way, suitable for all ages.

In 1945, Dr. Kesseling predicted that the modern technology will one day allow the use of a series of dental components that allow teeth movement. This technology enabled the realization of this vision. In 1998 Align Technology, Inc., which produces invisalign, was founded.

The aligners consist of a series of transparent, changeable trays that adapt over the teeth to make them straight, they are perfectly custom made for you. Invisible cosmetic retainers are more tempting because they are hard to notice, compared to conventional metal braces.

Invisalign is a real goal booster where you are on your way to reaching your confident smile without anyone realizing it.

 

How effective is invisalign treatment compared to conventional orthodontic method?

  • The same concept that applies for the traditional braces with wires and brackets works with invisalign. They move the teeth within a controlled force. The main difference is that invisalign not only controls the forces, but also the timing of the process of the force. During each stage, only certain predetermined teeth can move. These movements are determined by the doctor when each patient’s invisalign treatment is planned.

What to expect from your invisalign orthodontic treatment?

  • Enjoy your favorite food anytime without fearing that food will stick on your braces, these aligners are removable so you can brush and floss as usual for good oral health.
  • Wearing invisalign clear aligners made from medical grade polyurethane won’t hurt or sore your gums compared with braces, switching to a new tray with more tightness rarely cause pain or headaches.
  • Evaluation of patient discomfort during treatment has demonstrated generally less discomfort than fixed appliances.
  • Report on your progress and your smile transformation.
  • No more brackets and wire breaking issues and definitely fewer doctor visits.

Invisalign (Clear orthodontic aligners) steps and how it works?

  • Your dentist takes x-rays, photographs, and impressions of your teeth.
  • Creation of a 3D image on the screen where a detailed accurate treatment plan is established.
  • Multiple custom-made clear invisible trays will be fabricated specifically for you, also allowing evaluation of the proposed post-treatment occlusion on-screen, before treatment begins.
  • The number of serial devices for each patient is about 16 – 24 devices, where the patient wears these devices sequentially each device for two weeks.
  • By wearing a new set of aligners, your teeth will start to move gradually until they are straightened into the position of the aligner, in the same time, this will be followed up by your doctor for any needed treatment plan modifications.
  • The patient should remain in a specific appliance for 2 weeks to allow the appliance to recapture tooth position.
  • Treatment duration will vary from patient to another depending on each one’s case and the amount of dedication they put into wearing their aligners.
  • The patient wears this device full-time and only takes it off when food, drink, brushing teeth and the treatment period of 9-15 months.

Benefits of invisalign

  • Invisalign Frees up your schedule with fewer visits to the clinic.
  • One of the main advantages is that with up to 50% faster treatment times, invisalign treatment is quicker than you think.
  • Invisalign cuts down the time spent in dental clinic, and by changing the set of aligners every 2-3 weeks, you are moving on to the following step in your treatment plan 2 weeks faster than the braces.
  • Usually, the aligners can level your teeth from six months to maximum year and half.

What is the material invisalign made from?

  • Invisible Invisalign Orthodontic is made of thermoplastic material (Medical grade polyurethane) that have been developed specifically for Invisalign treatment. They look similar to tooth whitening molds but stiffer and specially costumed according to your arch size.

Did the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approve the use of invisalign?

  • The ingredients of invisalign have been classified as Level II medical devices by the FDA, and Align Technology Inc. has received the FDA 510K approval since 1998 to allow the marketing of the invisalign System.

Does invisalign suit you?

Your dentist will decide this depending on:

  • Malocclusion has to be mild to intermediate crowding.
  • Treatment outcome is highly dependent on clinician experience, as well as specific case selection which is determined by the dentist.
  • The problems encountering is patients losing, not wearing their appliances for a sufficient time (at least 20 hours per day); this will lead to return to the previous stage. For this reason; appliances should not be discarded until the patients are at least two stages ahead.
  • Patients who have complex malocclusions should understand that it may be necessary to place fixed appliances for several months either before or after the use of this appliance, to fulfill treatment goals.

What is the cost of invisalign?

  • Treatment cost, in general, varies depending on the situation and severity of the case.

What is the youngest age that can use invisalign?

  • Almost all patients over the age of 14 years can use Invisalign.

Is the treatment painful?

  • The patient feels mild and temporary discomfort during the first days of treatment, such as a sense of pressure on the teeth and this is a sign that the device works and moves the teeth towards the good condition.

Does the device affect pronunciation?

  • Like the rest of any mobile dental prosthesis, invisalign affects the pronunciation of some characters in a day or two and then the tongue get used and the problems disappear.

Forget the traditional orthodontics method using the braces. Ask your dentist about the almost invisible invisalign, for a fast, efficient, and easy and time saving teeth straightening. It is considered a revolutionary step in orthodontics.

Patient Education

Education Videos

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding
Crowns & Bridgework
Fillings
Gummy Smiles
Inlays & Onlays
Mouthguards for Adults
Mouthguards for Children
Nitrous Oxide
Porcelain Veneers
Removable Dentures
Smile Makeover
Snoring & Sleep Apnea
Teeth Whitening
TMD
Tooth-Colored Fillings
Tooth Contouring & Reshaping
Tooth Decay Prevention
Tooth Wear

Gum Injuries
Orthodontic Emergencies
Tooth Pain
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Combined Root Canal & Gum Problems
Cracked Teeth
Root Canal Retreatment
Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)
Root Canal Treatment
Root Canal Treatment FAQs
Root Canal Treatment for Children
Tooth Sensitivity
Whitening Traumatized Teeth

Bone Grafting
Dental Implants FAQs
Fixed Dentures
Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth
Top Reasons to Choose Dental Implants

Aging & Dental Health
Antibiotic Premedicationfor Dental Treatments
Bad Breath
Blood Pressure Medications & Your Gums
Diabetes & Oral Health
Dry Mouth
Eating Disorders & Oral Health
Fluoride
Geographic Tongue
Missing Teeth
Nutrition & Oral Health
Oral Cancer
Oral Piercings
Osteoporosis & Oral Health
Pregnancy, Hormones & Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Stress & Oral Habits

How To Brush
How To Floss
Interdental Cleaning Devices
Mouthrinses
Oral Hygiene for Kids
Tips to Prevent Cavities
Toothpaste

Blood Thinners & Dental Procedures
Bone Grafting
Cleft Lip & Palate Repair
Corrective Jaw (Orthognathic) Surgery
Extractions
Facial Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery
Headaches & Migraines
Oral Cancer Screening
Oral Diagnosis and Biopsies
Sedation Dentistry
Sinus Surgery
Wisdom Teeth

Adolescent Orthodontic Care
Adult Orthodontic Treatment
Brushing & Flossing with Braces
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Invisalign for Adults
Invisalign for Teens
Post-Orthodontic Care
Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)
Thumb & Finger Appliances
Types of Braces
Orthodontic Emergencies
Orthodontic FAQs
Orthodontic Headgear
Orthodontics & Dental Hygiene
Your First Orthodontic Appointment

Age One Dental Visit
Fluoride & Your Child
Nitrous Oxide for Children
Pregnancy & Your Child’s Developing Teeth
Sealants
Sleep Apnea & Behavior Problems in Children
Space Maintainers
Teething
Thumb Sucking

Cosmetic Gum Surgery
Gum Grafting
Loose Teeth & Bite Problems
Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
Oral Systemic Connection
Periodontal (Gum) Disease
Periodontal Flap Surgery
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Ultrasonic Cleanings

Air Abrasion
Anesthesia Wand
Cone Beam CT Imaging
Digital Dental Impressions
Digital X-Rays
Intra-Oral Camera
Laser Decay Diagnosis
Laser Dentistry
Same-Day Crowns (CAD/CAM)

The Importance of Annual Oral Cancer Screenings

June 24, 2018

As with any type of cancer, when it comes to oral cancer early detection is key and can mean the difference between a terminal diagnosis and an actionable plan to get back to wellness.

That’s why GIO Dental provides thorough screenings for oral cancer and it’s all part of our patient’s routine dental checkup procedure. This is yet another reason why you should come into your friendly neighborhood dentist to be examined regularly — twice annually or more is the ideal.

What To Expect from a GIO Dental Oral Cancer Screening

An oral cancer screening at GIO Dental includes a visual assessment of the following areas:

  • Lips
  • Tongue
  • Inside of the Mouth

We make sure to check for red or white patches or unusual sores. We may palpate (press the area with fingers) to detect the presence of lumps and swellings. We may manipulate the tongue for better viewing. A special light, dye might be incorporated to help us better check any suspect areas. If there is anything out of the ordinary, we’ll perform a biopsy.

When Should I Come in For an Oral Cancer Screening?

As mentioned previously, it’s a good idea to get checked at least once a year. But, you should make a special appointment if you exhibit any of the following symptoms:

  • Abnormal sores
  • Color changes in the mouth tissue
  • Color changes in the lips and tongue

Most sores and color changes end up being completely benign. However, if sores or discolorations persist after 2-3 weeks, you should come in to be examined.

We’d like to also remind our patients and readers that the only way to 100% accurately and effectively diagnose oral cancer is through a laboratory report, which we will handle during your appointment.

As mentioned above, it’s early diagnosis aided by thorough screenings at your regular dental checkups with GIO Dental that serve as the best defenses against oral cancer. Don’t wait to schedule your first oral cancer screening. Book your consultation today with GIO Dental.

Patient Education

Education Videos

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding
Crowns & Bridgework
Fillings
Gummy Smiles
Inlays & Onlays
Mouthguards for Adults
Mouthguards for Children
Nitrous Oxide
Porcelain Veneers
Removable Dentures
Smile Makeover
Snoring & Sleep Apnea
Teeth Whitening
TMD
Tooth-Colored Fillings
Tooth Contouring & Reshaping
Tooth Decay Prevention
Tooth Wear

Gum Injuries
Orthodontic Emergencies
Tooth Pain
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Combined Root Canal & Gum Problems
Cracked Teeth
Root Canal Retreatment
Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)
Root Canal Treatment
Root Canal Treatment FAQs
Root Canal Treatment for Children
Tooth Sensitivity
Whitening Traumatized Teeth

Bone Grafting
Dental Implants FAQs
Fixed Dentures
Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth
Top Reasons to Choose Dental Implants

Aging & Dental Health
Antibiotic Premedicationfor Dental Treatments
Bad Breath
Blood Pressure Medications & Your Gums
Diabetes & Oral Health
Dry Mouth
Eating Disorders & Oral Health
Fluoride
Geographic Tongue
Missing Teeth
Nutrition & Oral Health
Oral Cancer
Oral Piercings
Osteoporosis & Oral Health
Pregnancy, Hormones & Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Stress & Oral Habits

How To Brush
How To Floss
Interdental Cleaning Devices
Mouthrinses
Oral Hygiene for Kids
Tips to Prevent Cavities
Toothpaste

Blood Thinners & Dental Procedures
Bone Grafting
Cleft Lip & Palate Repair
Corrective Jaw (Orthognathic) Surgery
Extractions
Facial Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery
Headaches & Migraines
Oral Cancer Screening
Oral Diagnosis and Biopsies
Sedation Dentistry
Sinus Surgery
Wisdom Teeth

Adolescent Orthodontic Care
Adult Orthodontic Treatment
Brushing & Flossing with Braces
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Invisalign for Adults
Invisalign for Teens
Post-Orthodontic Care
Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)
Thumb & Finger Appliances
Types of Braces
Orthodontic Emergencies
Orthodontic FAQs
Orthodontic Headgear
Orthodontics & Dental Hygiene
Your First Orthodontic Appointment

Age One Dental Visit
Fluoride & Your Child
Nitrous Oxide for Children
Pregnancy & Your Child’s Developing Teeth
Sealants
Sleep Apnea & Behavior Problems in Children
Space Maintainers
Teething
Thumb Sucking

Cosmetic Gum Surgery
Gum Grafting
Loose Teeth & Bite Problems
Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
Oral Systemic Connection
Periodontal (Gum) Disease
Periodontal Flap Surgery
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Ultrasonic Cleanings

Air Abrasion
Anesthesia Wand
Cone Beam CT Imaging
Digital Dental Impressions
Digital X-Rays
Intra-Oral Camera
Laser Decay Diagnosis
Laser Dentistry
Same-Day Crowns (CAD/CAM)

The Ins And Outs of Inlays And Onlays

May 25, 2018

Your teeth have a hard job, and it’s a dangerous world out there for them. No matter how hard you work to keep them safe, they can get chipped or cracked and need repair. Fortunately, there are dental procedures that can fix your teeth up until they’re good as new. At GIO Dental we’re devoted to keeping your teeth looking perfect no matter what happens to them, which is why today we’re telling you everything you need to know about Inlays and Onlays.

What Are Inlays and Onlays?

Inlays and onlays are both methods to repair teeth that have slightly decayed or have not suffered a crack or fracture significant enough to require a dental crown. An inlay is generally smaller, and fits between the cusps, or rounded edges, of your teeth.

An onlay might cover one or more cusps, or even the whole biting surface of your teeth. To apply them, your dentist first numbs your tooth and removes any decay or damage by drilling, which also cleans and prepares the tooth. Then, a mold is taken for the Inlay or Onlay and a temporary filling is put in place to protect the tooth while it’s made. Finally, a second appointment is set up for the dentist to remove the temporary filling and place the Inlay or Onlay.

What Are The Benefits of Inlays and Onlays?

For one, Inlays and Onlays are very durable, and can last for up to thirty years. Furthermore, unlike metal fillings which often weaken your teeth, Inlays and Onlays can actually make your teeth stronger and extend their lifespan. The whole procedure is a rather quick processes, too, only requiring two appointments with a dental professional to complete.

When Should I Get Inlays or Onlays?

The right candidates for Inlays or Onlays have tooth damage that’s hard to treat with another procedure. Usually this means having tooth damage that’s a bit too severe for a traditional filling, but where there’s enough tooth left that a full dental crown isn’t necessary. If you have a filling that needs to be removed or replaced, Inlays are also often used for that.

In other words, Inlays and Onlays are simple, durable procedures that have substantial benefits over other methods of repairing damaged teeth. Even better, they’re a process we’re happy to offer at GIO Dental! All you have to do is book a consultation with one of our dedicated dental professionals, and they’ll be able to tell you if Inlays or Onlays are right for you. They can even start the procedure and schedule your follow-up right here in our offices.

Patient Education

Education Videos

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding
Crowns & Bridgework
Fillings
Gummy Smiles
Inlays & Onlays
Mouthguards for Adults
Mouthguards for Children
Nitrous Oxide
Porcelain Veneers
Removable Dentures
Smile Makeover
Snoring & Sleep Apnea
Teeth Whitening
TMD
Tooth-Colored Fillings
Tooth Contouring & Reshaping
Tooth Decay Prevention
Tooth Wear

Gum Injuries
Orthodontic Emergencies
Tooth Pain
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Combined Root Canal & Gum Problems
Cracked Teeth
Root Canal Retreatment
Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)
Root Canal Treatment
Root Canal Treatment FAQs
Root Canal Treatment for Children
Tooth Sensitivity
Whitening Traumatized Teeth

Bone Grafting
Dental Implants FAQs
Fixed Dentures
Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth
Top Reasons to Choose Dental Implants

Aging & Dental Health
Antibiotic Premedicationfor Dental Treatments
Bad Breath
Blood Pressure Medications & Your Gums
Diabetes & Oral Health
Dry Mouth
Eating Disorders & Oral Health
Fluoride
Geographic Tongue
Missing Teeth
Nutrition & Oral Health
Oral Cancer
Oral Piercings
Osteoporosis & Oral Health
Pregnancy, Hormones & Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Stress & Oral Habits

How To Brush
How To Floss
Interdental Cleaning Devices
Mouthrinses
Oral Hygiene for Kids
Tips to Prevent Cavities
Toothpaste

Blood Thinners & Dental Procedures
Bone Grafting
Cleft Lip & Palate Repair
Corrective Jaw (Orthognathic) Surgery
Extractions
Facial Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery
Headaches & Migraines
Oral Cancer Screening
Oral Diagnosis and Biopsies
Sedation Dentistry
Sinus Surgery
Wisdom Teeth

Adolescent Orthodontic Care
Adult Orthodontic Treatment
Brushing & Flossing with Braces
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Invisalign for Adults
Invisalign for Teens
Post-Orthodontic Care
Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)
Thumb & Finger Appliances
Types of Braces
Orthodontic Emergencies
Orthodontic FAQs
Orthodontic Headgear
Orthodontics & Dental Hygiene
Your First Orthodontic Appointment

Age One Dental Visit
Fluoride & Your Child
Nitrous Oxide for Children
Pregnancy & Your Child’s Developing Teeth
Sealants
Sleep Apnea & Behavior Problems in Children
Space Maintainers
Teething
Thumb Sucking

Cosmetic Gum Surgery
Gum Grafting
Loose Teeth & Bite Problems
Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
Oral Systemic Connection
Periodontal (Gum) Disease
Periodontal Flap Surgery
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Ultrasonic Cleanings

Air Abrasion
Anesthesia Wand
Cone Beam CT Imaging
Digital Dental Impressions
Digital X-Rays
Intra-Oral Camera
Laser Decay Diagnosis
Laser Dentistry
Same-Day Crowns (CAD/CAM)

Bad to the Bone: When Dental Caries Strikes Hard, It Strikes Deep

April 11, 2018

Dentists consider dental caries as a major oral health problem. It affects 18.6 percent of children and teenagers, and 31.6 percent of adults between 20 and 24 years old, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It adds that 91 percent of Americans over the age of 20 have had caries at one point in their lives.

The impact of dental caries on oral health depends on how early a patient detects caries and seeks treatment. If left untreated, it fosters bacterial growth and hastens tooth decay. Several dental and health conditions can also result from caries.

There’s Nothing Simple about Cavities

Cavities are a silent epidemic. They often start in the molars, which are out of sight. Unless they develop in anterior teeth, you may not notice them immediately. They’re not painful, too — at least not at the beginning. As a result, most adults don’t realize they have tooth decay until after the cavity has reached the nerves of their teeth.

What starts as a simple toothache can escalate to infection. The detrimental effects of cavities can snowball quickly from that point.

Gums are vulnerable to bacteria and infection. As a result, they swell, especially the tissues surrounding the sore tooth. In severe cases, abscess forms in the pulpy area of the tooth down to the gum. You’ll know you have an abscessed tooth if there’s a persistent bad taste in your mouth and you develop bad breath.

The pain due to cavity infection is like no other; if you experience it, you won’t take the idea of having more cavities too lightly again.

Apart from the pain and discomfort, cavities can result in more serious dental conditions.

The Worst-Case Scenarios

Tooth loss is the inevitable outcome of severe tooth decay. Bacteria eats its way through enamel and dentin, leaving pockets that trap food particles and promote further bacterial growth. If left untreated, the affected tooth can weaken and break apart.

Infection and abscess can also affect jawbone density and strength. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center says bacteria and the body’s immune system can weaken the bone, break connective tissues, and reduce the alveolar bone mineral density.

But jawbone deterioration is not the worst possible outcome of dental caries. Experts suggest that, given the proximity of the mouth to the brain, it’s possible for blood vessels to carry the infection to the latter. Meningitis due to caries, therefore, isn’t a scare tactic for you to maintain good oral hygiene habits. It’s a legitimate possibility when you let your dental health suffer.

Always Aim for Prevention

We always strive to save your tooth at Gio Dental at Station Landing; but, if you have severe tooth decay, we may have to remove it as a last resort. Rest assured we can replace the missing tooth through dental implant surgery at our clinic in Medford.

It’s illogical to wait for dental caries to escalate and cause infection and decay, but more so to allow them to develop in the first place. Although treatments are available, it’s best to avoid them entirely. And like most dental problems, the best defense against dental caries is good oral hygiene and regular visits to your dentist.

Schedule an appointment with Gio Dental at Station Landing. Our dentists will guide you through caries prevention and treatment.

Patient Education

Education Videos

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding
Crowns & Bridgework
Fillings
Gummy Smiles
Inlays & Onlays
Mouthguards for Adults
Mouthguards for Children
Nitrous Oxide
Porcelain Veneers
Removable Dentures
Smile Makeover
Snoring & Sleep Apnea
Teeth Whitening
TMD
Tooth-Colored Fillings
Tooth Contouring & Reshaping
Tooth Decay Prevention
Tooth Wear

Gum Injuries
Orthodontic Emergencies
Tooth Pain
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Combined Root Canal & Gum Problems
Cracked Teeth
Root Canal Retreatment
Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)
Root Canal Treatment
Root Canal Treatment FAQs
Root Canal Treatment for Children
Tooth Sensitivity
Whitening Traumatized Teeth

Bone Grafting
Dental Implants FAQs
Fixed Dentures
Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth
Top Reasons to Choose Dental Implants

Aging & Dental Health
Antibiotic Premedicationfor Dental Treatments
Bad Breath
Blood Pressure Medications & Your Gums
Diabetes & Oral Health
Dry Mouth
Eating Disorders & Oral Health
Fluoride
Geographic Tongue
Missing Teeth
Nutrition & Oral Health
Oral Cancer
Oral Piercings
Osteoporosis & Oral Health
Pregnancy, Hormones & Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Stress & Oral Habits

How To Brush
How To Floss
Interdental Cleaning Devices
Mouthrinses
Oral Hygiene for Kids
Tips to Prevent Cavities
Toothpaste

Blood Thinners & Dental Procedures
Bone Grafting
Cleft Lip & Palate Repair
Corrective Jaw (Orthognathic) Surgery
Extractions
Facial Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery
Headaches & Migraines
Oral Cancer Screening
Oral Diagnosis and Biopsies
Sedation Dentistry
Sinus Surgery
Wisdom Teeth

Adolescent Orthodontic Care
Adult Orthodontic Treatment
Brushing & Flossing with Braces
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Invisalign for Adults
Invisalign for Teens
Post-Orthodontic Care
Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)
Thumb & Finger Appliances
Types of Braces
Orthodontic Emergencies
Orthodontic FAQs
Orthodontic Headgear
Orthodontics & Dental Hygiene
Your First Orthodontic Appointment

Age One Dental Visit
Fluoride & Your Child
Nitrous Oxide for Children
Pregnancy & Your Child’s Developing Teeth
Sealants
Sleep Apnea & Behavior Problems in Children
Space Maintainers
Teething
Thumb Sucking

Cosmetic Gum Surgery
Gum Grafting
Loose Teeth & Bite Problems
Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
Oral Systemic Connection
Periodontal (Gum) Disease
Periodontal Flap Surgery
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Ultrasonic Cleanings

Air Abrasion
Anesthesia Wand
Cone Beam CT Imaging
Digital Dental Impressions
Digital X-Rays
Intra-Oral Camera
Laser Decay Diagnosis
Laser Dentistry
Same-Day Crowns (CAD/CAM)

You’ll Experience Little to No Discomfort During and After Implant Surgery

July 25, 2017

You’ve decided to obtain dental implants for your missing teeth. It’s a good choice — they provide the closest restoration to the function and appearance of natural teeth. You will, however, need to undergo a surgical procedure to imbed the implants’ threaded titanium posts into supporting bone.

It’s understandable if you’re a little apprehensive about undergoing surgery. We’re here, though, to set your mind at ease: implantation is a relatively minor procedure carefully planned in advance. Most patients experience no discomfort during the procedure and very little afterward.

We begin by completely numbing the surgical site with a local anesthetic. If you have a high level of anxiety, we can also administer a sedative or similar medication to help you relax. We then access the underlying bone through a series of incisions that create a flap in the gum tissue that we’ll later suture closed.

It’s quite common to have prepared a surgical guide or template beforehand. The template placed in the mouth marks the exact site for a small channel (or hole) we create in the bone. We then incrementally increase the size of the hole by drilling until it matches precisely the implant’s size and shape. This takes time to avoid overheating and damaging the bone.

We then remove the implant from its sterile packaging and insert it into the opening. We’ll also take x-rays to ensure correct positioning, which is critical for achieving an attractive result. We then suture the gum flap in place using stitches that will eventually dissolve. The implant will then integrate with the bone for a few weeks to create a strong, durable hold before we continue with the restoration.

Most patients can manage any post-surgical discomfort with mild anti-inflammatory pain relievers like aspirin or ibuprofen, although we can prescribe something stronger if you need it. We may also prescribe a mouthrinse with an anti-bacterial agent like chlorhexidine for you to use while the gums are healing to reduce the risk of infection.

Implant surgery is part of a long process that will eventually result in regaining the function of your lost teeth. What’s more, undergoing this minor procedure will also help you regain something just as important — a beautiful smile.

If you would like more information on dental implant restoration, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”

Patient Education

Education Videos

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding
Crowns & Bridgework
Fillings
Gummy Smiles
Inlays & Onlays
Mouthguards for Adults
Mouthguards for Children
Nitrous Oxide
Porcelain Veneers
Removable Dentures
Smile Makeover
Snoring & Sleep Apnea
Teeth Whitening
TMD
Tooth-Colored Fillings
Tooth Contouring & Reshaping
Tooth Decay Prevention
Tooth Wear

Gum Injuries
Orthodontic Emergencies
Tooth Pain
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Combined Root Canal & Gum Problems
Cracked Teeth
Root Canal Retreatment
Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)
Root Canal Treatment
Root Canal Treatment FAQs
Root Canal Treatment for Children
Tooth Sensitivity
Whitening Traumatized Teeth

Bone Grafting
Dental Implants FAQs
Fixed Dentures
Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth
Top Reasons to Choose Dental Implants

Aging & Dental Health
Antibiotic Premedicationfor Dental Treatments
Bad Breath
Blood Pressure Medications & Your Gums
Diabetes & Oral Health
Dry Mouth
Eating Disorders & Oral Health
Fluoride
Geographic Tongue
Missing Teeth
Nutrition & Oral Health
Oral Cancer
Oral Piercings
Osteoporosis & Oral Health
Pregnancy, Hormones & Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Stress & Oral Habits

How To Brush
How To Floss
Interdental Cleaning Devices
Mouthrinses
Oral Hygiene for Kids
Tips to Prevent Cavities
Toothpaste

Blood Thinners & Dental Procedures
Bone Grafting
Cleft Lip & Palate Repair
Corrective Jaw (Orthognathic) Surgery
Extractions
Facial Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery
Headaches & Migraines
Oral Cancer Screening
Oral Diagnosis and Biopsies
Sedation Dentistry
Sinus Surgery
Wisdom Teeth

Adolescent Orthodontic Care
Adult Orthodontic Treatment
Brushing & Flossing with Braces
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Invisalign for Adults
Invisalign for Teens
Post-Orthodontic Care
Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)
Thumb & Finger Appliances
Types of Braces
Orthodontic Emergencies
Orthodontic FAQs
Orthodontic Headgear
Orthodontics & Dental Hygiene
Your First Orthodontic Appointment

Age One Dental Visit
Fluoride & Your Child
Nitrous Oxide for Children
Pregnancy & Your Child’s Developing Teeth
Sealants
Sleep Apnea & Behavior Problems in Children
Space Maintainers
Teething
Thumb Sucking

Cosmetic Gum Surgery
Gum Grafting
Loose Teeth & Bite Problems
Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
Oral Systemic Connection
Periodontal (Gum) Disease
Periodontal Flap Surgery
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Ultrasonic Cleanings

Air Abrasion
Anesthesia Wand
Cone Beam CT Imaging
Digital Dental Impressions
Digital X-Rays
Intra-Oral Camera
Laser Decay Diagnosis
Laser Dentistry
Same-Day Crowns (CAD/CAM)

Neil Patrick Harris: What the Oscars Host Treasures Most

July 10, 2017

A few days before the OscarsVanity Fair magazine asked Academy Awards host Neil Patrick Harris to name his most treasured possession. Was it his Tony award statuette for best leading actor in a musical? His star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? The stethoscope he wore while playing teenaged doctor Doogie Howser on TV? No, as it turns out, the 41-year-old actor’s most treasured possession is… his wisdom teeth. Yes, you read that correctly. “Oddly, I still have my four wisdom teeth,” Harris said. “I refuse to let them go or I’ll lose my wise parts.”

How odd is it for a 41-year-old to have wisdom teeth? Actually, not that odd at all. While it is true that wisdom teeth are often removed, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to this. It all depends on whether they are causing problems now, or are likely to cause problems in the future.

The trouble wisdom teeth cause is related to the fact that they are the last molars to come in, and that molars are large in size. By the time wisdom teeth appear between the ages of 17 and 21, there often is not enough room for them in the jaw. Sometimes it’s because you may have inherited a jaw size that’s too small for your tooth size; and generally speaking, the size of the human jaw has evolved to become smaller over time.

If room is lacking, the adjacent molar (that came in earlier) can interfere with the path of eruption — causing the wisdom tooth to come in at an odd angle. The wisdom tooth can hit up against that other tooth, possibly causing pain or damaging the adjacent tooth. This is known as “impaction.” Sometimes the wisdom tooth breaks only partway through the gum tissue, leaving a space beneath the gum line that’s almost impossible to clean, causing infection. A serious oral infection can jeopardize the survival of teeth, and even spread to other parts of the body.

If a wisdom tooth is impacted, will you know it? Not necessarily. A tooth can be impacted without causing pain. But we can see the position of your wisdom teeth on a dental x-ray and help you make an informed decision as to whether they should stay or go. If removal is the best course of action, rest assured that this procedure is completely routine and that your comfort and safety is our highest priority. If there is no great risk to keeping them, as Neil Patrick Harris has done, we can simply continue to monitor their condition at your regular dental checkups. It will be particularly important to make sure you are reaching those teeth with your brush and floss, and that you keep to your schedule of regular professional cleanings at the dental office. All healthy teeth are indeed worth treasuring.

If you would like more information about wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctormagazine articles “Wisdom Teeth” and “Removing Wisdom Teeth.”

Patient Education

Education Videos

Cosmetic Tooth Bonding
Crowns & Bridgework
Fillings
Gummy Smiles
Inlays & Onlays
Mouthguards for Adults
Mouthguards for Children
Nitrous Oxide
Porcelain Veneers
Removable Dentures
Smile Makeover
Snoring & Sleep Apnea
Teeth Whitening
TMD
Tooth-Colored Fillings
Tooth Contouring & Reshaping
Tooth Decay Prevention
Tooth Wear

Gum Injuries
Orthodontic Emergencies
Tooth Pain
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Combined Root Canal & Gum Problems
Cracked Teeth
Root Canal Retreatment
Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)
Root Canal Treatment
Root Canal Treatment FAQs
Root Canal Treatment for Children
Tooth Sensitivity
Whitening Traumatized Teeth

Bone Grafting
Dental Implants FAQs
Fixed Dentures
Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth
Top Reasons to Choose Dental Implants

Aging & Dental Health
Antibiotic Premedicationfor Dental Treatments
Bad Breath
Blood Pressure Medications & Your Gums
Diabetes & Oral Health
Dry Mouth
Eating Disorders & Oral Health
Fluoride
Geographic Tongue
Missing Teeth
Nutrition & Oral Health
Oral Cancer
Oral Piercings
Osteoporosis & Oral Health
Pregnancy, Hormones & Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Stress & Oral Habits

How To Brush
How To Floss
Interdental Cleaning Devices
Mouthrinses
Oral Hygiene for Kids
Tips to Prevent Cavities
Toothpaste

Blood Thinners & Dental Procedures
Bone Grafting
Cleft Lip & Palate Repair
Corrective Jaw (Orthognathic) Surgery
Extractions
Facial Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery
Headaches & Migraines
Oral Cancer Screening
Oral Diagnosis and Biopsies
Sedation Dentistry
Sinus Surgery
Wisdom Teeth

Adolescent Orthodontic Care
Adult Orthodontic Treatment
Brushing & Flossing with Braces
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Invisalign for Adults
Invisalign for Teens
Post-Orthodontic Care
Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADS)
Thumb & Finger Appliances
Types of Braces
Orthodontic Emergencies
Orthodontic FAQs
Orthodontic Headgear
Orthodontics & Dental Hygiene
Your First Orthodontic Appointment

Age One Dental Visit
Fluoride & Your Child
Nitrous Oxide for Children
Pregnancy & Your Child’s Developing Teeth
Sealants
Sleep Apnea & Behavior Problems in Children
Space Maintainers
Teething
Thumb Sucking

Cosmetic Gum Surgery
Gum Grafting
Loose Teeth & Bite Problems
Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
Oral Systemic Connection
Periodontal (Gum) Disease
Periodontal Flap Surgery
Professional Teeth Cleanings
Ultrasonic Cleanings

Air Abrasion
Anesthesia Wand
Cone Beam CT Imaging
Digital Dental Impressions
Digital X-Rays
Intra-Oral Camera
Laser Decay Diagnosis
Laser Dentistry
Same-Day Crowns (CAD/CAM)

Request an Appointment

Request Appointment